Posted by: Witch Doctor | April 10, 2009

Professional neglience (2)

witchround

FORMER LOCUM HANDED SUSPENDED JAIL TERM FOR DISPENSING ERROR

A pharmacist has been given a suspended prison sentence for a dispensing error that has been shown NOT to have been responsible for a patient’s death.

It seems therefore, that the act of making an accidental error, rather than the consequences of that error is enough to decide whether or not a health professional is jailed.

Now read this, My Black Cat

PROSPECTIVE STUDIES OF THE INCIDENCE, NATURE AND CAUSES OF DISPENSING ERRORS IN COMMUNITY PHARMACIES.

Ashcroft DM, Quinlan P, Blenkinsopp A.

School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. darren.ashcroft@man.ac.uk

BACKGROUND: “Each year over 600 million prescription items are dispensed in community pharmacies in England and Wales. Despite this, there is little published evidence relating to dispensing errors and near misses occurring in this setting. This study sought to determine their incidence, nature and causes. METHODS: Prospective study over a 4-week period in 35 community pharmacies (9 independent pharmacies and 26 chain pharmacies) in the UK. Pharmacists recorded details of all incidents that occurred during the dispensing process, including information about: the stage at which the error was detected; who found the error; who made the error; type of error; reported cause of error and circumstances associated with the error. RESULTS: 125,395 prescribed items were dispensed during the study period and 330 incidents were recorded relating to 310 prescriptions. 280 (84.8%) incidents were classified as a near miss (rate per 10,000 items dispensed=22.33, 95%CI 19.79-25.10), while the remaining 50 (15.2%) were classified as dispensing errors (rate per 10,000 items dispensed=3.99, 95%CI 2.96-5.26). Selection errors were the most common types of incidents (199, 60.3%), followed by labeling (109, 33.0%) and bagging errors (22, 6.6%). Most of the incidents were caused either by misreading the prescription (90, 24.5%), similar drug names (62, 16.8%), selecting the previous drug or dose from the patient’s medication record on the pharmacy computer (42, 11.4%) or similar packaging (28, 7.6%). CONCLUSIONS: This study has demonstrated that a wide range of medication errors occur in community pharmacies. On average, for every 10,000 items dispensed, there are around 22 near misses and four dispensing errors. Given the current plans for reporting adverse events in the NHS, greater insight into the likely incidence and nature of dispensing errors will be helpful in designing effective risk management strategies in primary care. Copyright (c) 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.”

They say there are about 600,000,000 prescriptions dispensed per year in England and Wales.

Could you get the abacus, My Black Cat and work out just how many errors are made per year in England and Wales.

When you have done that, work out the number of extra prison cells that will be necessary to accommodate all the jailed pharmacists.

After that, you might give a thought to all the medical errors that are made.

And all the nursing errors.

And all the administrative errors.

And all the errors made by the various employees on the rungs of The Skills Escalator who are being supervised by professionally qualified staff.

Do you suppose we should turn all the nice brand new Polyclinics, Darzi Centres, Health Centres or whatever they are currently called into jails?

Yes?

But you think all the hospitals in the land will need to become penitentiaries too, to accommodate all the criminals infiltrating the NHS?

eh, My Black Cat?

redapple.jpg a red apple ……………………

The Witch Doctor – Link to a random page

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LINK TO UK MISSING KIDS WEBSITE

LINK TO MISSING PERSONS WEBSITE


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